In Our Skin

beauty, health, know, podcast February 12, 2020

In this episode, we’re getting into all things skincare, entrepreneurship, and community-building with Nayamka Roberts-Smith. Known as LA Beautyologist, Nayamka is an esthetician who popularized the 60-second rule, and CEO of The Golden Rx, a virtual skin studio, as well as The Golden RX Skin Studio here in Los Angeles. Nayamka focuses her expertise on the bodies of young women of color, a group unfortunately and often neglected by the wider skincare industry.  

Here’s our conversation, and how to connect with her:

Apple Podcasts

Spotify Podcasts

Google Podcasts

Stitcher

Book LA Beautyologist

Beautyologist Twitter

 

The Art of Activism

activism, podcast, politics, society February 5, 2020

As I mentioned in my first podcast post, I created “Oh, We’re Going There,” to keep you in the know on how Millennials and Gen-Zers are shaping and influenced by society. 

It only felt right to kick OWGTP off with a major change-maker like Bree Newsome. Bree is a Tisch School of Arts-educated artist, and an activist whose climbing gear is displayed in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C. from her successful climb to remove the Confederate flag from South Carolina’s statehouse.

Here’s my conversation with Bree and how you can connect with her:

Spotify Podcasts

Apple Podcasts

Bree’s Activism

Bree’s Films

Bree’s Twitter

 

Why I Started ‘Oh…We’re Going There’ Podcast

podcast February 3, 2020

When I started blogging in 2014, I had no idea what I was doing…But, little by little I figured out that I wanted to create a space that told stories of all kinds. I came up with visual stories and look books, but for a long time, the know was a bit lost on me…I had to get very vulnerable with myself in order to share my experiences. As I peeled back the layers, the idea of turning my experiences with everything from heartbreak to discrimination into pieces that people on the internet could read slowly became second nature.

Then, I started to view think pieces as an opportunity to educate, or to spotlight other creators and entrepreneurs, and to create conversations. I started to play around with different content mediums–from YouTube and IGTV, to shows on MTV and ABC–all helping me confirm my passion for unpacking complex subjects–like the economy, social justice, legislation, diplomacy–just as much as I am about creating my usual–fashion, travel, art, and entertainment.

In an effort to get people my age talking about those important things, I decided to start a podcast from a lens that seeks to understand how Black and Brown Millennials and Gen-Zers are shaping and influenced by society. Why? We live in a world where those voices simply don’t get enough play. End of story. But whether Black, Brown, White, Purple, or Green, Millennials and Gen-Zers have been through a lot; the oldest Millennials entered the job market during the 2008 Financial crisis, have seen endless wars, ballooning student loan debt, report higher rates of depression and anxiety than previous generations, and have seen horrifying changes in the environment.

But through it all, Millennials and Gen-Z have found ways to be more vocal about things like gun violence, the US prison complex system, and LGBTQ+ issues, amongst many other things. And even though we’re characterized as entitled and lazy, members of our generations have created just about every leading tech company, and innovative service that has impacted the lives of nearly everyone on the planet. 

So, I decided to start “Oh…We’re Going There,” to talk about the gutsy things–real things–not the BS that reality TV is force-feeding us. And yeah, I’ve been there, done that with MTV Ghosted…but my podcast is an unfiltered version of stories that matter from change-makers like Nayamka Roberts-Smith, Bree Newsome Bass, Jaime Harrison, Shannon Watts, Shirley Raines, Saira Rao, and many more. 

So, let’s go there:

Listen on Google Play Music

Spotify Podcasts

Apple Podcasts

Stitcher

Twitter Updates

Lookbook 01.21

fashion January 21, 2020
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With time, I’ve proudly grown into an outfit-recycler. I haven’t completely given up adding pieces to my closet here and there, but I try to modify as many things from past seasons as possible. I’m still a sinner for consumption, but nowadays I make a concerted effort to keep things in my closet for as long as possible. So, I’m sure you’ll catch me in some of these next year…and maybe even the year after that.

Processed with VSCO with p5 preset Dress: Free People (Nordstrom Rack) Shoe: Nine West (Marshalls)Processed with VSCO with p5 presetProcessed with VSCO with p5 presetJeans: Joes Jeans (Nordstrom Rack) Shoe: Nike Air Force 1 (Revolve)Processed with VSCO with p5 presetJacket: Philosophy

Processed with VSCO with p5 presetProcessed with VSCO with p5 presetDress: ASOS Boot: ZaraProcessed with VSCO with p5 presetBag: ASOSProcessed with VSCO with p5 preset

Blouse: PrettyLittleThing

The More Representation, The Better

business, know, society, thinkpiece, youtube January 14, 2020

“I think it’s very important for people to be celebrating all these different types of people because you never know who your customer is going to be.” – Christian Siriano

Historically, the “tried-and-tested” formula in advertising of what’s sexy, smart, or overall, just good, has been very, very white, young, heterosexual, and able-bodied. We see this in the years-long lack of representation of minority groups within media, as well as the perpetuation of stereotypes about women, as docile, overly-emotional sex objects, and men, as powerful, emotionless, head-of-household’s.

Before “taking a chance” on ‘The Cosby Show’ and ‘Roots,’ Hollywood’s white, male executives often believed that putting Black people on television wouldn’t be of interest to most Americans–yet, both sitcoms went on the have two of the most viewed episodes in TV history. When it comes to female misrepresentation, feminist activist and advertising researcher Jean Kilbourne has tackled the perniciousness of these beliefs throughout her career; and though improvement has been made since she began her work in the 1960s, gender stereotypes in advertising remain, and creep into our society in much bigger ways. 

Off of TV screens and billboards, we see proof of this in education, wherein history textbooks and leisurely reads alike facilitate the erasure of important events for POC and LGBTQ+ people by the lack of coverage. In 2016, POC accounted for a measly 22% of children’s book characters, though making up more than 40% of the US population in thirteen states alone.

It’s no surprise then, that the lack of representation of all of these groups is also apparent within corporations and the cultures they cultivate. The many fiascos, involving major players like Victoria’s Secret’s former head Ed Razek, celebrity brands, like Kim Kardashian with her now-defunct ‘Kimono’ shapewear, and ubiquitous brands like Nike that represents women in their advertising while facilitating the mistreatment of female athletes within their running program, shows the power of having a diverse chorus of open, and well-informed minds at the head of an operation.

Marketing Exec. Sekinah Brodie points out that “different perspectives and including a variety of people can only help bring out the best in a product or service. When you decide what type of culture you want, listening to your team will help to cultivate that.”

In today’s hyper-social market, wherein your next loyal customer is only an Instagram scroll or soundbite away, what is the point of not creating a team that reflects society as a whole, and has the know-how to inform the brand in a way that widens its reach?

*The author of “The Building of Luxury” is Kyojira Hata