Tag: self-check

The Face of America

america, identity, racism September 24, 2020

No matter where I go, I am never far removed from America:

A place lead by an aspiring authoritarian whose unconstitutional actions have consistently been upheld by other money-hungry, power-hungry, bad partisans.

A place where executive power topples all else, rendering checks and balances more of an illusion than a necessary practice.

A place where protecting people from an insidious virus is not a priority, but, downplaying the government’s responsibility in containing it, is. 

A place where government officials can work for tax-payer dollars while emboldening vigilantes to attack anyone who speaks out against a president who stands against so many.

A place where harmful misinformation is actively spread about antifascists, while the rise of white supremacy, posing the biggest terror threat to the country, goes underreported. 

A place where policies that worsen wealth disparities are instituted by an administration that touts ‘major economic growth,’ benefitting the top 10%, whilst millions of Americans teeter on the brink of eviction, hunger, or joblessness. 

A place that has successfully modernized and legalized slavery, and solidified a system that benefits greatly from the labor of incarcerated people within for-profit prisons. 

A place committing genocide by performing mass hysterectomies on women within ICE’s concentration camps. 

A place where police officers get charged for causing more harm to inanimate objects than they do for murdering Black women, men, and children. 

A place that is quickly growing more authoritarian than it is democratic. 

America’s racism is in Supreme Court decisions; the air and the water; and it’s pastimes. And it’s in you too. One thorough vibe check would show us the insincerity of the this-isn’t-who-we-are’s, when all signs strongly point to what America is, and always has been: the home of unabashed racism.

“Even the Nazis did not stoop to selling souvenirs of Auschwitz, but lynching scenes became a burgeoning sub department of the postcard industry. By 1908, the trade had grown so large, and the practice of sending postcards featuring the victims of mob murderers had become so repugnant, that the U.S. Postmaster General banned the cards from the mails.”

–Richard Lacayo, Time Magazine (2000)